North Iceland (Einar Gudmann)
Frosen trees near Hrafnagil.

I don´t know why, but most of the time I make plans to go somewhere photographing. That means driving for hours to remote locations. Today my brain was fried from too much computer work and I went for a short drive near my home in Akureyri. I tend to forget that we have seals, birds, ice, unbelievable light and snow at close distance. I was quite happy with the results from my two hour break from the computer. Uploaded few photos from today to my gallery. I must remind myself to go more often out. There is nothing more relaxing and it is a privilege to be able to get close to nature just outside my home.

North Iceland (Einar Gudmann)
These photos are taken near Akureyri in Eyjafjordur. Near Hrafnagil there are beautiful ice-formations worth visiting.

Ringed seal (Phoca hispida)
Ringed seals are a rare sight in Iceland. This one took me by surprise. I started by thinking it was a Harbour seal but got pointed out that it was a Bearded seal. It is a Ringed seal which is almost only seen in Eyjafjordur area. This was my lucky day since this is my first photo of a Ringed seal. The ringed seal Pusa hispida or Phoca hispida, also known as the jar seal and as netsik or nattiq by the Inuit, is an earless seal (family: Phocidae) inhabiting the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions.
The Common Murre or Common Guillemot (Uria aalge) is a large auk. It is also known as the Thin-billed Murre in North America. (Einar Gudmann)
I thought this Common Murre was frozen to the ice, but I checked up on it on my way back and it was gone.
The male birds have bright green head, while the female is light brown. The Mallard lives in wetlands, eats water plants, and is gregarious. (Einar Gudmann)
Sleeping beauties in the mist.
North Iceland (Einar Gudmann)
Backlight gives life to the trees. Also taken near Hrafnagil.
The male birds have bright green head, while the female is light brown. The Mallard lives in wetlands, eats water plants, and is gregarious. (Einar Gudmann)
Simply female mallard the simple way.

I think I am not the only photographer who needs a kick in the ass once in a while. There is a beautiful world out there.

 

Previous articleThe many faces of Kirkjufell
Next articleReunion with a family of common mergansers after nine years